MEASURING THE IMAPCT OF BUSINESS INTELLEGENCE ON PERFORMANCE: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY - Polish Journal of Management Studies

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MEASURING THE IMAPCT OF BUSINESS INTELLEGENCE ON PERFORMANCE: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY

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MEASURING THE IMAPCT OF BUSINESS INTELLEGENCE ON PERFORMANCE: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY
AL-Shubiri F.

Abstract: In this study explain rapidly changing business environment, the need for very timely and effective business information is recognized as being indispensable for organizations not only to succeed, but even to survive. Business intelligence (BI) is a concept which refers to a managerial philosophy and a tool that is used in order to help organizations and refine information and to make more effective business decisions. The sample of study is 50 industrial firms for the period 2006-2010 listed on Amman Stock Exchange .The results indicates the Knowledge economy variable measured by intellectual capital are more significant and effect of performance and this study has shown that the provision of appropriate support with regard to BI is needed as BI plays a crucial role to support decision-making in firms of all sizes more than learning and growth or financial factor but there is no significant level for customer variable

Keywords: Business intelligence, Intellectual capital, Performance

Introduction

The participation of firms in the knowledge economy is important not only for their own competitive advantage in the marketplace but also for the competitiveness of their country as a whole. Business intelligence systems combine operational data with analytical tools to present complex and competitive information to planners and decision makers. The objective is to improve the timeliness and quality of inputs to the decision process. Business Intelligence is used to understand the capabilities available in the firm; the state of the art, trends, and future directions in the markets, the technologies, and the regulatory environment in which the firm competes; and the actions of competitors and the implications of these actions.
The BI terminology in recent years has been con-fusing. There are different interpretations of BI and many terms applied to it (e.g. competitive intelligence, market intelligence, customer intelligence, competitor intelligence and strategic intelligence). The use of these terms is haphazard both in academia and the business world. After all, almost all the definitions share the same referent even if the term has been defined from several perspectives [4] and they all include the idea of analysis of data and information. The main idea in BI is to aid in controlling the vast stocks and flow of business information around
then processing the information into condensed and useful managerial knowledge and intelligence.
The task described includes nothing too new and it responds to old managerial problems. For example, [6] have stated that organizations have
collected information about their competitors since the dawn of capital-ism. The real revolution is in the efforts to institutionalize intelligence activities. Thus, it is likely that all organizations have some kind of BI activities or similar activities. There are some questions to know BI as following: Business Intelligence is used to understand the capabilities available in the firm: the state of the art, trends, and future directions in the markets, the technologies, and the regulatory environment in which the firm competes; and the actions of competitors and the implications of these actions.

Business Intelligence systems present complex corporate and competitive information to planners and decision makers. The objective is to improve the timeliness and quality of the input to the decision process. Business intelligence is a form of knowledge. The techniques used in knowledge management for generating and transferring knowledge, [7] apply. Some knowledge is bought (e.g., scanner data in the food industry) while other knowledge is created by analysis of internal and public data. Knowledge transfer often involves disseminating intelligence information to many people in the firm. For example, salespeople need to know market conditions, competitor offerings, and special offerings. Business intelligence (BI) is the most recent development of systems that support organizational decision-making. For example, an owner-manager may want to know not only the revenue generated per client but also how profitable each client is to decide which clients to target for future sales and marketing efforts. ...

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Summary

This study has explored the role of BI in industrial firms on Jordan knowledge-based from the perspectives of the key decision-maker. This paper has focused on outlining the importance of tacit economic knowledge for the business intelligence process measured by intellectual capital in industrial firms as one perspective affect of performance and learning and growth process , customer and finally financial perspective .These all variable exploring the business intelligence factor. The main purpose of BI at firms is to enhance decision-making and service efficiency. The main targets include efficiency, reasonable coverage of BI and user satisfaction. BI comprises both internal and external business information, market information and analysis. In fact, the whole concept of BI deals with providing insightful information related to various business activities. Thus, it would be surprising if the managers responsible for BI were not interested in obtaining intelligence concerning its own operations.

The results indicates the Knowledge economy variable measured by intellectual capital are more significant and effect of performance and this study has shown that the provision of appropriate support with regard to BI is needed as BI plays a crucial role to support decision-making in firms of all sizes more than learning and growth or financial factor but there is no significant level for customer variable.

POMIAR WPŁYWU ANALIZY DANYCH BIZNESOWYCH NA WYDAJNOŚĆ: BADANIA EMPIRYCZNE


Streszczenie
: W niniejszym badaniu autor wyjaśnia szybko zmieniające się warunki prowadzenia działalności gospodarczej, określa potrzebę terminowej i efektywnej informacji biznesowej która jest niezbędne organizacjom, nie tylko do osiągnięcia sukcesu ale także dla ich przetrwania. Business Intelligence (BI) to koncepcja, która odnosi się do filozofii kierowniczej oraz narzędzie, które jest używane, aby pomóc organizacji i udoskonalenia informacji i podejmowaniu trafnych decyzji biznesowych.

Słowa kluczowe
: Inteligencja biznesowa, kapitał intelektualny, wydajność


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